Formal and Informal Red Meat Industry in the Western Cape

Hidden in Plain Sight: A Regional Inquiry into the Size, Scope and Socioeconomic Effects of the Western Cape’s Formal and Informal Red Meat Industries

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research Focus Areas: Animal Health and Welfare; Animal Products, quality and safety, nutritional value and preference; The economics of red meat consumption and production in South Africa

Research Institute: Agriculture Research Institute – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Dr Nick Vink PhD (Agric)

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Mr. Michael McCullough M

Completion Date 23 August 2018

Aims Of The Project

  • 3.1 To determine and report the size and scope of the informal red meat I industry as well as the informal industry’s effects on food safety, animal health and l welfare and food security with an initial focus on the Western Cape.
  • 3.2 To determine and report the size and scope of the formal red meat industry as well as the formal industry’s effects on food safety, animal welfare and food security with a primary focus on the Western Cape.
  • 3.3 To create and test a combined quantitative and qualitative methodology for determining the size and scope of the red meat industry in South Africa with a primary emphasis on the informal sector, a secondary emphasis on the formal sector as well as recommendations for improving current levels of food safety, animal welfare and food security.

Executive Summary

The genesis of Hidden in Plain Sight was two previous studies of red meat marketing systems: one in a rural Municipality in the Western Cape that discovered an informal shadow industry operating alongside a formal system of abattoirs, supermarkets and independent butcheries; the other in the townships and informal settlements of Cape Town that described an informal marketing system filling a vacuum created by the abdication of the formal system of supermarkets and butcheries. Beyond the scope of both studies was an appreciation of the size and scope of the Province’s informal systems of red meat production, processing and distribution. Hidden in Plain Sight attempts to determine size and scope of the Province’s informal red meat industry, its effects on food security, food safety and animal health and welfare.

Informal livestock farmers pasturing cattle and sheep primarily on Municipal land as well as raising pigs in improvised piggeries furnish livestock for informal processing; i.e. outdoor slaughter and indoor butchery in unlicensed facilities such as home kitchens and food stands. One and two kilo ‘value paks’ are then sold from kitchen butcheries in rural communities. Braai stands located near taxi ranks, train stations and major intersection in the former townships of Khayelitsha, Gugulethu and Nyanga in the Cape Town Metropole receive live animals directly from informal producers located on City land surrounding these communities. The animals are slaughtered on the sidewalk in front the stands or in any other adjacent open space. The muscle meat is sliced into strips and braaied, the heads are skinned, split and charred and the offal is piled on the counter for sale to hawkers or take-home consumers.

The informal system exists in both urban and rural areas to serve the 2.6 million low to very low income households in the Western Cape. In addition to low incomes many urban and rural households live in virtual ‘food deserts’ where, in the absence of transportation either public or private access to food sellers is at best difficult.  Low to very low incomes and lack of access expose over half of the Province’s households to food insecurity and place 29 percent at risk of hunger.

An expectation at the inception of this study was that size and scope of the informal system although unknown would rival the formal red meat system and would be sufficient to serve a significant percentage of the Province’s food insecure households. Such was not the case. Survey data based on inspections of informal production sites throughout the Province, census  and interview data from the Veterinary Service and the Farmer Support and Development programmes of the Western Cape Department of Agriculture and interviews with Municipal Social Development officials yield numbers of informal produced livestock clearly insufficient to serve a fraction of households at risk for hunger. Three recommendations are offered to increase the capacity of the informal industry to serve food insecure households: conduct a comprehensive inventory of public land suitable for informal production; establish an informal production, processing and distribution pilot project in each District Municipality; investigate existing parallel formal – informal marketing systems in Latin America; develop a prototype two tiered regulatory frame work to facilitate food security whilst ensuring food safety.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Dr Nick Vink  on nv@sun.ac.za

Discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms

Genome-wide genetic marker discovery in South African indigenous cattle breeds using next generation sequencing

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research Focus Area: Livestock production with global competitiveness: Animal growth, nutrition and management

Research Institute: Agriculture Research Institute – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Dr. Avhashoni Zwane

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Prof. Azwihangwisi Maiwashe PhD
Title Name Surname Highest Qualification
Prof Este Van Marle-Koster PhD
Prof Jerry Taylor PhD
Prof Mahlako Makgahlela PhD
Dr Ananyo Choudhury PhD
Dr Farai Muchadeyi PhD

Aims Of The Project

  • To conduct a genome wide search for new SNPs in local cattle breeds
  • To validate newly identified SNPs using Run 5 data from the 1000 Bull Genomes Project and perform functional annotation and enrichment analysis
  • To identify selective sweeps and a panel of SNP markers to discriminate between the three indigenous breeds

Executive Summary

South African (SA) livestock has played an important role in food security country’s sustainability. Due to the important role of indigenous cattle breeds in SA, it is crucial for these breeds to be included in the generation of genotypic and sequence data. Genomic data provide opportunity for various genetic investigations including identification of breed-informative markers, selective sweeps and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In this study sequence data were generated and used in combination with genotypic data to conduct a SNP discovery in the three indigenous SA breeds (Afrikaner, Drakensberger, and Nguni) and study potential selective sweeps and identify panel of breed-specific markers. Commercial bovine SNP assays, (BovineSNP50 and GGP-80K) were used for identifying the breed-informative markers, while an approach of breed pooled samples were used for sequencing. Sequencing of the three breeds generated approximately 1.8 billion (184 Giga-bp) of high quality paired-end reads which 99 % reads mapped to the bovine reference genome (UMD 3.1), with an average coverage of 21.1-fold. A total of 17.6 million variants were identified across the three breeds with the highest number of variants identified in NGI (12,514,597) than in AFR (11,165,172) and the DRA (7,049,802). In total 89 % of variants were SNPs and 11 % were Indels. On average, 85 % of the total SNPs identified were also shared among the breeds from 1000 Bull Genomes Project data and the remaining 15 % of SNPs were unique to SA indigenous breeds. Novel SNPs were further annotated to identify genes enriched in novel SNPs. In total, 461, 478 and 542 genomic regions identified from the top (5%) windows were enriched for novel variants (p < 0.001). A total of 174 putative breed-specific SNPs were identified across the breeds and showed the overall 100% breed allocation using PCA and GeneClass 2. This study provides the first analysis of sequence data to discover SNPs in indigenous SA cattle breeds and the results provide insight into the genetic composition of the breeds and offer the potential for further applications in their genetic improvement.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project –  vhashoni Zwane  on Zwanea@arc.agric.za

Crossbreeding Afrikaner, Bonsmara and Nguni cows

Crossbreeding effects with specialized sire lines in Afrikaner, Bonsmara and Nguni beef cattle herds

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research Focus Area: Livestock production with global competitiveness: Breeding, physiology and management

Research Institute: Agriculture Research Institute – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Dr. M Scholtz

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Mrs. A. Theunissen MSc
Title Name Surname Highest Qualification
Prof F W C Neser Ph.D.
Mr. L De Lange Nat. Dipl.
Mr. T Jonker M.Sc.
Mr. F J Jordaan M.Sc. (Agric)
Dr M D MacNeil Ph.D.
Mr. O Ntwaeagae B.Tech
Mr. W Pieterson Nat. Dipl.
Ms. M C Mokolobate M.Sc. (Agric)
Ms. G M Pyoos B.Sc. (Agric. Sci.)
Ms. M Mokgadi M.Tech

Aims Of The Project

  • 1. To estimate the genetic and phenotypic trends in the dam lines
  • 2. To evaluate crossbreeding systems and quantify the phenotypic progress made in economically important traits in crossbred cattle for beef production
  • 3. To characterize the additive and non-additive genetic effects for production and health traits in progeny of terminal sires and dam line breeding cows
  • 4. To validate an existing simulation model for the development of breeding objectives for specialized sire lines on Landrace breed cows for use in small scale and commercial farming that better meet commercial feedlot requirements
  • 5. To make recommendations with regard to future selection and management of beef herds in warm arid areas
  • 6. To evaluate alternative production systems in anticipation of global warming

Executive Summary

Climate has been changing and these changes are predicted to be highly dynamic. Increasing frequencies of heat stress, drought and flooding events are likely, and these will have adverse effects livestock production. It is therefore important that production systems utilizing local landrace and adapted breeds that are better adapted to warmer climates, be investigated.

In South Africa extensive cattle farming dominate primary cattle production systems, while more than 80% of all beef cattle slaughtered in the formal sector in South Africa originate from commercial feedlots. A total of 67% of feedlot animals are crossbreds, indicating that crossbreeding is playing a significant role in the commercial industry in South Africa. Well-structured crossbreeding systems allows producers to capture benefits from complementarity and heterosis.

The study is being conducted at Vaalharts Research Station. The aim is to use the Afrikaner, Bonsmara and Nguni as dam lines in crosses with specialized sire lines from British (represented by Angus) and European (represented by Simmentaler) breeds. In addition these dam lines were also mated with Afrikaner, Bonsmara and Nguni bulls in all combinations. This is producing 15 different genotypes.

It is anticipated that the information from five breeding seasons will be needed for the a more comprehensive study. Currently the information from three seasons are available and have been summarized. A protocol for Phase 2 of the study has been submitted.

The phenotypic trends in production traits of the three breeds over 25 years revealed an increase in cow productivity in all the breeds varying from 10% in the Bonsmara to 18.3% in the Afrikaner, where cow productivity was defined as kg calf weaned per Large Stock Unit mated. This also resulted in a decrease in the carbon footprint of up to 12%. The bottom line is that cow productivity can be improved if the weaning weight of the calf relative to the weight of the cow can be increased; and the inter-calving period reduced. Well-structured crossbreeding should have a much bigger effect on this and therefore the environmental impact, will be included in the final analyses of this study.

The simulation study indicated that breed, weaner and carcass price have an influence in the gross income from weaner and ox production systems. The simulation model in question can be used to quantify the benefits from the different crosses on completion of the study on condition that it is based on sound assumptions regarding weaner and carcass prices.

The information on 550 weaner calves and 125 feedlot bulls are currently available. The heaviest weaning weights are from Simmentaler sires on Afrikaner (220 kg) and Bonsmara (213 kg) dams, as well as Angus sires on Bonsmara (252 kg) dams. The lightest weaner calves were produced from purebred Ngunis (171 kg) and Angus sires on Nguni dams (173 kg). The severe draught and extreme heat of the 2015/2016 summer season had a big effect on the Angus and Simmentaler sired calves. The Sanga sired calves and Angus/Simmentaler sired calves had the same weaning weight (171 kg) in this season. In contrast, the 2016/2017 summer season was cooler and wetter, resulting in the weaning weight of the Angus/Simmentaler sired calves being 27 kg heavier than the Sanga sired calves (210 kg versus 183 kg). This demonstrates the importance of including the effect of climate on the pre- and post-weaning performance in Phase 2 of the experiment.

At the completion of the study all the information will be updated and this baseline information used to evaluate how effective the current crossbreeding systems in South Africa are and to quantify the direct and maternal heterotic effects, the possible/promising advantages of structured crossbreeding, as well as the effect of climate.

The very dry and hot 2015/2016 season also had an effect on the post weaning feed intake and growth. For example, the ADG of the Angus and Simmentaler types decreased by 17%, whereas that of the Sanga and Sanga derived types (Afrikaner, Bonsmara, Nguni) decreased by 9%, as a result of the heat waves experienced.

It is foreseen that indigenous and adapted beef breeds may become more important in South Africa as a consequence of climate change that will result in more challenging environments. The use of specialized sire and dam lines offer an opportunity to increase output by taking advantage of heterosis and complementarity. The effects of weather patterns on beef production in South Africa should also be estimated and thereafter, mitigation strategies developed in the era of climate change to ensure optimal production efficiency.

With the information collect from the GrowSafe system, it will be possible to study feed and water intake patterns as well as behavior of individual animals and different genotypes. This may give valuable information on the effect of climate on animal performance and behavior.

This study produced one M.Sc. thesis, 8 peer reviewed scientific articles, chapters in books and conference proceedings, as well as 8 popular articles.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Michiel Scholtz on gscholtz@arc.agric.za

Effects of growth enhancers on residues in lamb

The effects of steroidal growth implants and β- adrenergic agonist, alone, or in combination on feedlot performance and residues in lamb

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research Focus Area: Animal Products, Quality and Value-adding

Research Institute: University of Pretoria

Researcher: Prof Edward Webb

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Dr A.L. Le Riche BVSc, MScAgric
Dr Shaun Morris BVSc(Hons), MScAgric

Final Report Approved: 23 August 2018

Aims Of The Project

  • To investigate the feedlot performance of feedlot lambs treated with different steroidal growth implants, alone or in combination with oral beta-agonist supplementation
  • To investigate the effects of different steroidal growth implants, alone or in combination with oral beta-agonist supplementation on the residues in the meat
  • To investigate the effects of different steroidal growth implants, alone or in combination with oral beta-agonist supplementation on carcass and meat quality

Executive Summary

The objective of this study was to compare four commonly used growth promotants in a commercial sheep feedlot. The steroidal growth promotants chosen for this trial were Ralgro (zeranol), Revalor G (Rev G; TBA/oestrogen- 17β), Revalor H (Rev H; TBA/oestrogen- 17β) and Zilmax® (zilpaterol hydrochloride). The growth promotants were compared with one another and within three sex groups, namely ewe, ram and wether (castrates), to determine which molecule or combination of molecules, if any, had the most benefit and profitability when measured against a control group.  Sheep were stratified based on initial weights and then randomly allocated to treatment groups in a completely randomised control study. All sheep originated from the same farm, and they were of  similar age, breed,  transport method,  processing method, feed ( the only difference being  the groups receiving Zilmax® during the last 18 days of feeding, making provision for 3 days withdrawal), weather conditions, housing and time on feed. A time constant termination date was used in this study, in order to measure the performance of lambs in treatment groups over time.

The experimental groups were compared over a 10 weeks feeding period according to growth and carcass parameters. The parameters that were measured were gain, FI (feed intake), FCR (feed conversion ratio), ADG (average daily gain), WCM (warm carcass mass), DP (dressing percentage), CL (carcass length) and CC (carcass compactness). Data was recorded in an Excel spread sheet and checked for accuracy. The effect of experimental treatments on growth and production parameters were analysed by means of the GLM ANOVA procedure in SAS (2006). Differences between treatment means were tested at the P<0,05 level of significance by means of the Bonferroni multiple range test in order to correct for unbalanced data (missing values). Correlations between variables were analysed by means of the Pearson product moment procedure in SAS.

Data was analysed within weeks, treatment phases and also over the entire experimental period. Effects of sex, steroid treatment and beta-agonist treatment and interaction effects were calculated. In terms of growth and slaughter parameters the use of zilpaterol hydrochloride alone proved most effective. The latter can be explained by the repartitioning effect of the BAR which increased protein accretion as a result. Benefits gained were not always statistically significant, however taking cost of treatment into account, there is a definite financial significance when choosing which combination of growth promotants to use. Muscle and liver samples were collected for residue analyses, which indicated no significant residue’s in any of the treatment groups. The current data indicate that the use of the various combinations of growth enhancing molecules in sheep pose no risk to consumers in terms of the presence of residue’s, provided that the molecules are used according to prescribed procedures and dosages.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Prof Edward Webb on edward.webb@up.ac.za

Animal welfare, stress biomarkers and meat quality

Pre-slaughter stress, animal-related factors, stress biomarkers, nanostructure and technological properties of beef

Industry Sector: Cattle And Small Stock

Research Focus Area: The Economics Of Red Meat Consumption And Production In South Africa

Research Institute: Fort Hare

Researcher: Dr. Voster Muchenje PhD

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Prof A Hugo PhD
Dr A. Y Chulayo PhD

Final Report Approved: 23 August 2018

Aims Of The Project

  • 3.1 To determine the expression of heat shock proteins, cortisol and glucose and the quality of beef in slaughtered bovine species. 3.2 To determine the activities of stress enzymes in relation to carcass and physico-chemical characteristics of beef from cattle slaughtered under practical 3.3 To determine the effects of pre-slaughter stress and inborn characteristics carcass of beef quality

Executive Summary

The main objective of the study was to determine the effects of transportation, distance travelled, lairage duration and animal-related factors on pre-slaughter stress indicators, carcass characteristics, nanostructure and technological properties of beef from six genotypes of cattle. Transportation and handling of slaughter animals is associated with a series of events that expose animals to stressful and unfavourable conditions, compromising their welfare and meat quality. Stress experienced by animals in unfavourable environmental conditions increases the synthesis of stress proteins. In a heat-shocked cell, the proteins begin to unfold and denature, resulting in the production of heat-shock proteins (HSP). HSPs are a subgroup of molecular chaperones, which are classified into five families (HSP100, HSP90, HSP70, HSP60 and small HSPs [sHSPs]) according to thein molecular weights. During this process, HSPs may bind to heat-sensitive proteins and protect them from degradation. Under normal growth, HSPs maintain homeostasis by regulating the folding quality control of proteins. It includes stressed and non-stressed proteins that accompany unfolded polypeptides.

The study showed that exposing cattle to longer hours of transportation with reduced lairage period did not only decrease glucose levels, but also increased the expression of heat shock proteins, cortisol, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase which are good indicators of animal welfare. Furthermore, pre-slaughter stress negatively affected the beef nanostructure and technological properties, and heifers had the best muscle fibres, sarcomere length and visible intercalated discs with improved tenderness, colour and pH.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Dr Voster Muchenje on vmuchenje@ufh.ac.za

Genetic study on wet carcass syndrome

Detection of quantitative trait loci affecting wet carcass syndrome in sheep

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research focus area: Animal Products, Quality and Value-adding

Research Institute: Agricultural Research Council – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Lené van der Westhuizen

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Prof MM Scholtz D.Sc.
Prof MD MacNeil Ph.D.
Prof FWC Neser Ph.D.
Prof A Maiwashe Ph.D.
Mrs A Theunissen M.Sc.
Ms M le Roux M.Sc.

Final report approved: 23 August 2018

Aims of the project

  • To map quantitative trait loci affecting wet carcass syndrome.
  • To identify specific loci affecting the predisposition to wet carcass syndrome (detection of a major gene).
  • To develop a diagnostic test for the genetic predisposition to wet carcass syndrome (if a candidate gene can be identified as the cause).
  • If a major gene is not responsible for wet carcass syndrome the second phase of the project will have the aim to develop a polygenic prediction equation for the predisposition of sheep to wet carcass syndrome.

Executive Summary

Wet carcass syndrome (WCS) is a condition predominantly found in sheep, which negatively affects the quality of their carcasses. During the pre-slaughter period, the animal appears to be clinically normal, showing no symptoms of an abnormality. However, after the removal of the skin during the slaughter process the carcass appears to be “wet”. When the description and results of prior research are taken into account, no physiological, environmental or management system was conclusively identified as the causative agent of WCS. Previous research has also not considered a potential genetic basis for WCS or the potential for an interaction of genotype with the environment (stress). Furthermore, the tentative breed-specificity, i.e. Dorper sheep breed, of the condition lends some credence to a potential genetic basis for it. The current study employed the Ovine Infinium® HD SNP BeadChip and a genome-wide association analysis approach to scan the genomes of both afflicted- and unafflicted sheep in search of putative quantitative trait loci associated with the WCS phenotype. This study was not only one of the first in Southern Africa to make use of this specific BeadChip but also the first to investigate the role of genetics as a causative factor of WCS. Muscle samples from sheep carcasses (33 afflicted and 36 unafflicted) were collected from three different abattoirs.

Using a candidate gene approach it was possible to map genetic loci, RYR1 (Chromosome 14) and PRKAG3 (RN¯; Chromosome two) causative of phenotypically similar conditions such as porcine stress syndrome and red, soft and exudative meat to the ovine genome, respectively. The positions of these loci mapped to the ovine genome were not in accordance with the loci showing significant association with the WCS phenotype; and no relationship was found between single nucleotide polymorphisms located within these genes and WCS. Furthermore, along with the latter approach, the test of runs of homozygosity presented similar results as well as providing plausible evidence that WCS is not a recessive inherited condition.

To test for an association between the phenotype (WCS) and a genetic marker(s) i.e. SNPs, a case-control study design was implemented. Given the relatively small sample size of the current study, the results obtained from the GWAS attested strong evidence of at least two loci, oar3_OARX_29903534 and oar3_OARX_113973214 positioned within the non-homologous region of the X chromosome for WCS carcasses. All afflicted animals, both males and females, carried at least one allele for marker oar3_OARX_113973214, which was shown to be related to the WCS phenotype. On the contrary, some of the unafflicted animals also carried this specific allele.  Given the apparent influence of stress on WCS, these unafflicted males and females in all likelihood did not experience adequate levels of stress to manifest the condition post-slaughter. The results of the current study also indicated that WCS may possibly be a rare X-linked inherited condition, provided only female individuals are considered. Finally, two possible major loci involving two major genes, HTR2C and DMD, positioned on the non-homologous region of the X chromosome have been identified as novel positional and functional candidate genes for WCS in sheep.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Lené van der Westhuizen on PienaarL@arc.agric.za

Lamb and Mutton Quality Audit

South African Retail Lamb and Mutton Quality Audit

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research focus area: Animal Products, Quality and Value-adding

Research Institute: Agricultural Research Council – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Dr Michelle Hope-Jones

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Dr PE Strydom Ph.D Animal Science
Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Dr L Frylinck Ph.D Biochemistry
Dr SM van Heerden Ph.D Home Economics
Prof A Hugo Ph.D Biochemistry
Ms J Anderson N D Analytical Chemistry
Mrs JD Snyman N D Food Technology

Final report approved: 23 August 2018

Aims of the project

  • o measure the instrumental/physical quality (shear force tenderness, water holding capacity/cooking loss, fat and muscle colour, collagen properties, oxidative status (rancidity)), sensory qualities and chemical composition of lamb and mutton rib or loin chops (M. longissimus dorsi) from various retail outlets (including brand names and generic products).
  • To determine the reasons for variation in quality by chemical, histological, physical and biochemical tests.
  • To use the information from 3.1 and 3.2 to arrive at a list of factors needed to be addressed in research and/or technology transfer to improve meat quality in South Africa.

Executive Summary

Twenty three products (lamb loin chops) were identified and collected from the shelves of five major retail outlets and twelve smaller butcheries on 14 different dates over a three month period (n=306, certain products where not always available due to drought conditions). Products varied in type, namely Karoo lamb (lamb valued for it unique flavour attributes due to grazing on herbaceous bushes and shrubs from a particular region of South Africa), free range or feedlot. Products also varied in packaging (Modified atmospheric packaging: MAP, PVC overwrap, to openly displayed on shelves) and retailers and butcheries were spread over various socio-economic areas. Price was recorded and shear force tenderness, sensory evaluation (tenderness and flavour), colour of meat, drip loss, cooking losses and meat/fat/bone ratios were measured as properties valued by consumers at or after purchase. Physical, histological and biochemical measurements (proximate and fatty acid analyses, lipid oxidation and collagen) were performed in an attempt to explain variations in consumer related properties.

  • Both instrumental and sensory evaluations showed tenderness to be at a high level of acceptance across the board. The Karoo samples were the most tender with the free-range samples performing the worst especially with regard to sensory tenderness.
  • Karoo lamb stood out for ‘barnyard’ aroma and flavour while free-range samples stood out for ‘Karoo bossie” aroma and flavours meaning they could be distinguished from the other samples and from each other. In both cases however, the scores were of a low intensity. Karoo and free-range lamb are purchased for their distinctive flavour.
  • Karoo and free-range samples lost less drip during cooking compared to the remaining products. Thawing loss was very low in general for all the products.
  • Karoo and free-range products have more loin muscle and less fat per chop compared to feedlot products.
  • Colour of all products was at an acceptable level with no distinct pattern showing for any particular product.
  • Lipid oxidation was at a good level over all products and fatty acid profile were consistent with free-range vs. grain-fed products. This makes the lack of free-range and Karoo flavours more perplexing.
  • Karoo and free-range products were more expensive. Regarding the remaining products, price correlated more with socio-economic area and butchery vs. retailer.
  • In general lamb is of a good quality except for drip loss which needs to be attended to. This could be due to incorrect abattoir practices. Karoo lamb is sold at a premium and its lack of flavours is of concern. The consumer however is able to consistently buy tender loin chops at any retailer or butchery.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Michelle Hope-Jones on hopejonesm@arc.agric.za

Nutrient content of lamb and mutton offal

The nutritional composition of South African lamb and mutton offal

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research focus area: Red Meat Safety, Nutritional Value, Consumerism and Consumer Behaviour

Research Institute: University of Pretoria

Researcher: Dr JL Linde du Toit

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Prof HC Schönfeldt PhD

Ms C Muller MSc
Dr N Hall PhD
Ms M Bester MSc
Ms D Human Matric

Final report approved: 23 August 2018

Aims of the project

  • To determine the nutritional composition of South African lamb and mutton offal products (raw and cooked)
  • To determine yield, retention and physical composition of the different cooked offal products to ultimately determine the edible portion of each product
  • To incorporate the nutritional composition data and physical composition data into the national food composition tables as well as the food quantities manual of the Medical Research Council

Executive Summary

Offal, also called variety meats, or organ meats or the ”fifth quarter”, have been overlooked in the past in dietary guidelines and recommendations, irrespective of their potential contribution to food and nutrition security. This study focussed on understanding the physical and nutrient composition, as well as the potential nutritional contribution of lamb and mutton offal, when used in the correct amounts, to South African diets.

Significant amounts of protein, iron and zinc (three nutrients of concern in South Africa) can be found in selected organ meats which compared favourably with beef and lamb muscle meat cuts. The most significant findings of the study were the high levels of protein (>10g/100g) found in all cooked lamb and sheep offal cuts ranging from 14.26g/g (cooked lamb intestines) to 32.6g/100g (cooked sheep kidneys). High levels of total iron were found in cooked sheep lungs (TFe=10.73mg/100g); cooked sheep spleen (TFe=11.71mg/100g); cooked sheep liver (TFe=7.95mg/100g) cooked lamb lungs (TFe=8.368mg/100g) and lamb spleen (TFe=22.83mg/100g).

Instead of simply focussing on total protein, attention has shifted to the greater importance of protein quality than actual quantity, emphasising the presence of individual amino acids in a food. Protein quality answers two important questions namely, how much protein as well as what kind of protein should be consumed. Dietary proteins are classified as either being complete or incomplete. Foods containing all essential amino acids (indispensable amino acids) are referred to as a complete protein. The sum of the essential amino acids for lamb and mutton offal varies between 4.2 g/100g and 8.1 g/100g for mutton tongue and liver respectively. The study found that South African lamb and mutton offal adheres to the requirements as set out by the Department of Health to be labelled and proclaimed as a complete, quality protein.

Offal products contribute consistently to the diet not only in terms of essential fatty acids such as linoleic acid (C18:2n-6) and arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6), but also eicosanoic (arachidic) acid (C20) and docosanoic acid (C22) polyunsaturated fatty acids. Ruminant meats and oily fish are the only significant sources of preformed and C22 PUFA in the diet (Enser, et al., 1998; Wyness, et al., 2011). Although human beings have the metabolic capacity to synthesize C20 and C22 fatty acids from the n-6 or n-3 precursors of linoleic and α-linolenic acid respectively, an increase in the consumption of C20 and C22 n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could overcome the perceived imbalance in the ratio of n-6:n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in modern diets.

Based on the results of this study South African lamb and mutton offal cuts can be considered a good source of protein and also a nutrient dense food source. Due to the current state of nutrition in South Africa such foods are important commodities and the promotion thereof should be prioritised.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Beulah Pretorius on beulah.pretorius@up.ac.za

Slaughter conditions to optimise chevon meat quality

Determination of slaughter conditions to optimise chevon visual and eating quality

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research focus area: Animal Products, Quality and Value-adding

Research Institute: Agricultural Research Council – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Dr L Frylinck PhD

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Prof PE Strydom PhD
Prof EC Webb PhD Animal Science
Dr P Pophiwa PhD Animal Science
Prof LC Hoffman PhD Animal Science
Ms GL van Wyk MSce (Registered for PhD)
Ms JD Snyman ND Histologie

Final report approved: 23 August 2018

Aims of the project

  • 3.1.1 To determine the expression of genomic markers in five South African purebred genotypes – Bos indicus
  • To determine the optimum slaughter procedures (electrical stimulation for 15 – 60 seconds or delayed/step wise chilling – time determined by optimal pH) for carcasses from castrated and intact male goats of two breed types: Boer Goats and Indigenous Veld Goats (IVG, Eastern Cape Xhosa or Northern Cape Speckled Goats
  • To evaluate the tenderness and connective tissue characteristics in six different muscles m. longissimus thoracis et longissimus (LTL), m. semimenbranosus (SM), biceps femoris (BF), supra spinatus (SS), infra spinatus (IS) and semitendanosus (ST) in electrical stimulated carcasses of Boer Goats and IVG from castrated and intact male goats.
  • To evaluate the tenderness and calpain system ageing related characteristics in m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) and m. semimembranosus (SM) muscles of electrical stimulated and non-stimulated carcasses of Boer Goats and IVG from castrated and intact male goats.
  • To evaluate sensory attributes and other meat quality characteristics of chevon from the respective post-slaughter treatments in m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) and m. semimembranosus (SM) muscles of electrical stimulated and non-stimulated carcasses of the two breed types; Boer Goats and IVG from castrated and intact male goats

Executive Summary

The demand for goat meat in South Africa is relatively low because of traditional perceptions of off smells, off flavours and expected toughness. Perceptions also exist that Indigenous Veld Goat (IGV) produce tougher meat than Boer Goat (BG) specially bred to be a meat producing breed. The name indigenous goat is perceived as being small and not suitable for meat production. It is now discovered that some Indigenous Eco-types of Southern Africa, compare well with the Boer goat in size, can also produce good meat products if good farming and rearing practices are followed. Except for the advantage to preserve the indigenous breeds for the future generations, these breeds are well adapted to the harsh climate conditions in Southern Africa and are hardy with minimum need for veterinary intervention. Production and slaughter procedures should be adapted to suit the characteristics such as the low glycolytic potential and low carcass fat of goat carcasses. There is therefore a need to optimise the pre- and post-slaughter procedures in order to optimise the chevon (goat meat) visual and eating quality.

The first aim were investigated by applying different pre- and post slaughter procedures such as castration or not, applying electrical stimulation for 20 and 30 seconds or apply stepwise chilling. The monitoring of the muscle pH and temperature, muscle energy, meat colour and tenderness showed that either controlled step wise chilling or electrical stimulation of at least 30 sec will prevent cold toughening and produce ideal conditions for the intra muscular proteolytic enzymes to optimally function. It was found that castrated animals produced more tender meat than intact carcasses, but that more subcutaneous fat were produced, which could be advantageous to its eating experience. Both breed types: Boer Goats and Indigenous Veld Goats (IVG, Eastern Cape Xhosa or Northern Cape Speckled Goats, showed the same advantage in tenderness and colour if slaughter conditions were optimised.

The intrinsic characteristics of the six different muscles m. longissimus (LTL), m. semimenbranosus (SM), biceps femoris (BF), supra spinatus (SS), infra spinatus (IS) and semitendanosus (ST) differed from each other as expected, but castrated muscles had an higher intramuscular fat content – up to 4% than that on intact carcasses – similar in both breed-types tested. Percentage collagen solubility did not differ between the different muscles, but the total collagen measured in each muscle type did differ. Thus is optimal cooking method important.

Evaluating the tenderness and calpain system ageing related characteristics in m. longissimus thoracis et lumborum (LTL) and m. semimembranosus (SM) muscles of electrical stimulated and non-stimulated carcasses of Boer Goats and IVG from castrated and intact male goats confirm that the breed types did not differ in tenderness, but castration do have an advantageous effect on tenderness. It is said for beef that sarcomere length (SL) longer than 1.7 µm does not influence tenderness, but in this project it was obvious that the shorter 1.8 µm sarcomere length compared to that of our first subproject of 2 µm could have influenced meat tenderness. It is said that the calpain system works more effectively when the SL length is longer.

Sensory panel evaluation showed attributes and other meat quality characteristics of chevon from the respective post-slaughter treatments in m. longissimus (LTL) and m. semimembranosus (SM) muscles of electrical stimulated and non-stimulated carcasses of the two breed types; Boer Goats and IVG from castrated and intact male goats. Overall it seems like the sensory panel found the LTL and SM muscles tough, although the shear force measurements was not exactly inline with their findings. As mentioned before, the slaughter conditions could have been chosen better, for instance the ES should have been 30 sec and not 20 sec. Delayed/stepwise chilling could have given better results. I do recommend though that if a future sensory panel study is being done, mutton should be included to remove the possibility of biasness. Although I have no reason to doubt the professionalism of the panel, I do think that there could be a possibility of a negativity towards goat meat.

The evaluation of carcass characteristics and yield of electrical stimulated and non-stimulated carcasses of the two breed types; Boer Goats and IVG from castrated and intact male goats (additional aim) showed more differences between castrated and non-castrated carcasses than between carcasses of the two breed types. The dressing percentages did not differ between the castrated breeds, but was a bit higher that that of the intact carcasses. There was no significant differences in the percentage meat yield between breeds, although the different commercial cuts could differ a bit in sizes, mainly because of different ratios and form of different parts of the carcass that is genotypic-ally expected.

From this project a better understanding is formed on how goat temperament differ from other farm animals, that pre and post slaughter conditions must be adapted to take their unique characteristics into account. A small change in slaughter practice can have a mayor impact on the end product. Information acquired from these and future research should be disseminated to the farmers, producers and specific abattoirs that apply to special slaughter facilities and management for chevon production.

.Development of the market for chevon in South Africa would offer more diversity of species for red meat producers and especially benefit emerging farmers who produce over 90% of the goats in South Africa. There are good indications that goats can yield chevon or kid of acceptable quality to consumers, providing that animals of an appropriate age and sex group are slaughtered, handled and fed well during production and slaughter so as to minimise stress and prevent cold shortening.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Lorinda Frylinck on lorinda@arc.agric.za

Genomic markers in beef tenderness

The effectiveness of genomic markers in predicting the meat tenderness in pure beef genotypes under South African production and slaughter conditions

Industry Sector: Cattle and Small Stock

Research focus area: Livestock production with global competitiveness: Breeding, physiology and management

Research Institute: Agricultural Research Council – Animal Production Institute

Researcher: Dr L Frylinck PhD

Title Initials Surname Highest Qualification
Prof PE Strydom PhD
Ms A Basson MSc

Final report approved: 23 August 2018

Aims of the project

  • 3.1.1 To determine the expression of genomic markers in five South African purebred genotypes – Bos indicus (Brahman), Sanga type (Nguni), British Bos taurus (Angus), European Bos taurus (Charolais) and the composite (Bonsmara) for genes associated with beef tenderness in meat.
  • 3.1.2 To determine the relationship between the actual physiological tenderness characteristics under South African production and slaughter conditions of the meat from these five main South African genotypes and the known DNA-marker information.
  • 3.1.3 To assess the phenotypic variation in meat tenderness within South African selected pure beef genotypes under the same environmental conditions and to build a tenderness prediction model.

Executive Summary

Purebred South African bulls of 5 breeds (n=166) were finished on a grain diet at the Animal Production Institute of the Agricultural Research Council (API-ARC), Irene. Breeds included Angus (n=27; representative of British Bos taurus), Brahman (n=35; Zebu type Bos indicus), Bonsmara (n=35; South African composite breed with large Sanga contribution), Charolais (n=34; European Bos taurus) and Nguni (n=35; Sanga type Bos taurus africanus). Animals were sampled over 3 slaughter periods in 2011 (50 animals), 2012 (50 animals) and 2014/2015 (66 animals). Bulls were sourced from breeders that are registered with the appropriate breeders’ associations and were progeny of registered pure breed bulls and cows. Bulls were ≃9 months old when entering the feedlot and reared under feedlot conditions for ≃120 days to ≃12 months old. Bullas were slaughtered to yield A2/3 carcasses (zero permanent incisors, lean to medium fatness). Bulls were penned overnight with access to water before slaughter following captive bolt immobilization at the abattoir of the API-ARC. All treatments and procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee of the Agricultural Research Council (ARC AEC-I 2010 001).

To determine whether the effects of genotype were additive to electrical stimulation, the right half of the carcass was electrical stimulated for 15 seconds at 500V peak, using 5 ms pulses at 15 pulses per second and directly chilled at 4 °C. The left half of the carcass was not electrically stimulated (served as a control), while chilling was delayed for 6 hours (at 10 °C) to allow for the full development of metabolic processes within muscle fibers before chilling at 4 °C.

Animal measurements included weights, recorded during the feedlot growth period to determine body weight gain (total gain and average daily gain) and liver body weight (BW) measured on the day before slaughter as a final weight. Carcass measurements included hot carcass weight (HCW; used to calculate dressing percentage), cold carcass weight (used to determine carcass mass loss), EMA (in the thoracic region at T9/10), pH and temperature (measured at the lumbar end of the LTL). Beef quality estimates measured from samples collected directly from the carcass or from LTL excised from the lumbar region (L6) up to the thoracic region (T9/10) included myofibrillar fragment length (MFL), Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), calpain enzyme system activities, sarcomere length (SL), colour measurements, energy metabolites, collagen (content and solubility) and water-holding capacity (WHC). Colour was determined using the CIE L*A*b* colour convention with measurements of L*, a*, b*, C* and hab over the ageing period. Energy metabolites included the concentrations of glycogen, glucose 6-phosphate, glucose, lactate, creatine phosphate and ATP determined at 1 h, 3 h, 6 h and 20 h post‑mortem.

The genes that are most likely to affect beef quality, specifically tenderness, as those of the calpain enzyme system. Calpain-1, calpain-2, calpain-3 and calpastatin are all found in the sarcoplasm and are known to determine post‑mortem proteolysis. The genes for these proteins can therefore be identified as causative to proteolysis at least, but potentially also for beef tenderness. We therefore used the 114 SNPs located in these causative genes (capn1capn2capn3 and cast respectively) to determine their genotypic distribution, as well as the association of these genotypes with beef quality traits in order to determine the importance of these genes in determining the quality (tenderness) phenotype. These data were used to identify possible markers for genomic selection (GS), once they were validated for tenderness in South African beef breeds.

  • The capn1 gene (on BTA29) was validated for beef tenderness, with a large number of strong associations (relatively high correlations) with estimates of beef tenderness, found in both the ES and the NS treatment groups. It correlated especially with MFL as a measure of physical tenderness (r2= 0.07 to 0.15), with fewer SNPs explaining the phenotypic variation in WBSF (r2 = 0.09 to 0.10). Almost no associations occurred with calpain-1 enzyme activity itself, but the effects of the SNPs in capn1 was rather a change in the responsiveness of the enzyme to calpastatin inhibition, as shown by several relatively strong correlations (r2 = 0.07 – 0.12) to the relative calpastatin inhibition per calpain(-s).
  • The capn2 gene (on BTA16) was validated for beef tenderness, explaining the phenotypic variation in, especially, the activities of calpain-1 and calpain-2 (r2 = 0.07 – 0.11). Although effects on enzyme activities were evident, these changes only resulted in a few significant associations of the genotypes with physical tenderness MFL (r2 = 0.07 – 0.09).
  • The capn3 gene (on BTA10) exhibited very few associations with beef quality. The protein coded by this gene is responsible for background proteolysis and does not cause variation in tenderness. The lack of an effect of these SNPs on tenderness is therefore unsurprising.
  • The cast gene (on BTA7) is quite large (136,434 bp) and contained a large number of SNPs (63), of which only 4 exhibited extensive effects on tenderness. Many of the correlations with MFL ranged between 0.07 – 0.11, although a few SNPs exhibited strong phenotypic correlations with MFL (r2 = 0.12 – 0.16), while associations with WBSF were less common and less pronounced (r2 = 0.07 – 0.11). These differences in physical tenderness were only in part explained by differences in the total and /or relative inhibition of calpastatin of protease enzyme activities (r2 = 0.07 – 0.12).

Using SNPs of the Illumina Bovine HD SNP BeadChip the capn1capn2 and cast genes were verified for tenderness in SA purebred beef cattle. The amount of phenotypic variation in tenderness estimates explained by some of these SNPs were large, making them useful targets for genomic selection in these breeds. Both Nguni and Bonsmara exhibited high allelic frequencies for alleles that were favorable for tenderness, giving them the genetic potential to produce tender beef.

Please contact the Primary Researcher if you need a copy of the comprehensive report of this project – Lorinda Frylinck on lorinda@arc.agric.za